Can I claim for pre-trade expenses?

Updated on 12 July 2016

In this section, we discuss pre-trade expenses and how you go about claiming them.

What are pre-trade expenses?

Pre-trade expenses are those that you pay out before you start trading. As a general rule, trade cannot commence until you are:

  • In a position to provide the goods and services that your trade will provide (for example you have bought some stock); and
  • You do provide, or offer to provide, the goods and services to your customers

However, to get to the point of being able to start trading you are likely to have spent money on things necessary for your business such as buying equipment, buying stock, paying rent for premises, getting insurance, advertising. These expenses are likely to be pre-trade expenses.

Pre trade expenses can also include items that you owned privately that you will now use in your business.

Pre trade expenses, as with other expenses, can either be normal expenses that are deductible when working out your profit or capital expenditure that is given relief through capital allowances.

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Can I claim for pre-trade expenses?

If the expenses were incurred within seven years of you starting to trade, and the expenses would have been tax-deductible if you had incurred them while you were trading, then you can treat them as if they were incurred on your first day of trading and so claim them in addition to the other business expenses relating to the first period of trading. This rule does not apply to expenses that will form part of your accounts in any case for example costs of stock.

Example

Brian starts trading as an electrician on 1 June 2016. He had 500 leaflets printed to advertise his services in March 2016. The cost of these leaflets will be treated as a separate deduction from his profits in the first accounting period. This is because such advertising costs would normally be deducted from his trading profits had he paid for them after he started trading and they were incurred within seven years of trade commencing.

Example

Amelia starts trading as a coffee shop on 1 August 2016. She had to pay legal costs in July 2016 in connection with signing a 99-year lease for the shop. She will not be able to claim the legal costs as pre-trade expenses for tax purposes because such expenses would not normally be deducted from trading profits as they are capital costs.

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Once I deduct pre-trade expenses my results show a loss. What happens to the loss?

You can read about this in the section 'what if I make a loss?'.

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I incurred costs before I began trading that were capital costs. Can I get any tax relief?

If you incur capital expenditure, on assets that will be used in your trade, before trading starts, the expenses are treated as being incurred on your first day of trading. Therefore you may be able to claim capital allowances.

Example

Giovanni buys shelving for his shop on 3 March 2016, but does not start trading as a florist until 1 May 2016. He will be treated as buying the shelving on 1 May 2016 and can claim capital allowances on the cost of the shelving (as long as he has not elected to use the cash basis).

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