Am I employed, self-employed or both?

Updated on 15 November 2017

Whether you are employed or self-employed depends on the facts. It is important for you to understand whether you are an employee or self-employed. If a business offers you work and does not operate Pay As You Earn (PAYE) because it decides that you are self-employed, but HMRC later disagree with this, then typically HMRC should chase the business first. BUT - they could come after you too, if they think that you colluded with the business in the failure to operate PAYE.

Am I an employee?

To find information to help you decide whether or not you are an employee, including a list of factors that indicate employment, look at ‘am I employed, self-employed, both or neither?’ in the ‘self-employment’ of this website.

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Am I self-employed?

To find information to help you decide whether or not you are self-employed, including a list of factors that point towards self-employment, look at ‘am I employed, self-employed, both or neither’ in the ‘self-employment section’ of this website.

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What if some factors point to employment and some to self-employment?

It is important to note that no single factor is decisive. It is possible that some factors will point to employment and others will point to being self-employed. Then, the overall position must be considered.

For more information, look at ‘am I employed, self-employed, both or neither’ in the ‘self-employment section’ of this website.

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Can I be employed and self-employed at the same time?

Yes, it is possible to be both employed and self-employed at the same time if you have two different jobs. For example, if you work for yourself as a hairdresser during the day (self-employed) but in the evening you work as a receptionist in a hotel (employed).

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